Amid looming power shortages, Japan's

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 Amid looming power shortages, Japan’s

 

Anti-Nuclear Rally In Japan thousands of people. In recent months, about a 1,000 people have protested every Friday outside the Prime Minister’s office in Tokyo — in an attempt to put pressure on Noda. Representatives of the move‑

 
Amid looming power shortages, Japan’s Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda pbns to reduce the country’s dependence on atomic energy but not completely abandon it Hence, earlier, Noda announced his deci­sion to restart two reactors and subsequently restarted them. But, opposition to Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda’s energy policy has been growing in Japan. The demonstra­tors have been calling for Noda to abandon the atomic energy programme following last year’s Fukushima accident Fukushima accident occurred last year following a msive earthquake off Japan which created a tsunami. The tsunami swamped the Fuku­shima Daiichi plant, sending three reactors into meltdown, spewing radiation over a large area and forcing the evacuation of

Anti-Nuclear Rally In Japan

thousands of people. In recent months, about a 1,000 people have protested every Friday outside the Prime Minister’s office in Tokyo — in an attempt to put pressure on Noda. Representatives of the move‑
ment asked Noda to reverse his decision to restart two reactors and urged him to abandon nuclear power altogether. Noda declined to switch off the two reactors that were restarted earlier.

DON’T LOWER THE BAR ON NUCLEAR SAFETY, SAYS 1AF.A HEADA five-day conference (27 to 31 August 2012) at the IAEA headquarters recently brought together 75 states that are party to the 1994 Convention on Nuclear Safety (CNS). About 700 participants attended the CNS’ Second Extraordinary Meeting and the Organizational Meeting for the Sixth Review Meeting to analyse the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident’s aftermath. The head of the U.N. atomic agency called on countries with nuclear power not to lose their “sense of urgency” in improving safety after last year’s Fukushima disaster in Japan. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) head Yukiya Amano outlined measures that have been taken since last year’s Fukushima disaster. These included implementing measures outlined in the IAEA’s Action Plan drawn up after Fukushima such as assessing possible risks, improving readiness for emergencies, reviewing safety standards and convening expert meetings.

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